what kind of bills should i expect to be paying when im 18 and living in an apt?

im 17 and will be 18 soon and i am planning to move out of my parents house in a year or so and i was wondering what kind of bills will i be expecting to pay.. besides the obvious charges like rent, food, cell phone bill, car payments, etc.. you know.. but is there anything else i should know about?? i will also be having a room mate which is a very close friend.. if that matters any haha thanks for your help!
m 17 and will be 18 soon and i am planning to move out of my parents house in a year or so and i was wondering what kind of bills will i be expecting to pay.. besides the obvious charges like rent, food, cell phone bill, car payments, etc.. you know.. but is there anything else i should know about?? i will also be having a room mate which is a very close friend.. if that matters any haha also i will be living close to home and gettin some furniture donations from our parents haha but we live in a generally low cost living area :)

One more that nobody has mentioned:

Health Insurance

If you are still in school/ college, you can still be covered by your parent’s policy, but once you’re 18 and ‘living on your own’, you can’t be covered any more.

Be sure you have a job that provides coverage BEFORE you move out, because a simple visit to the doctor can cost you hundreds, and prescriptions aren’t cheap!

If you’ll be losing coverage, schedule a visit to your doctor before it ends — and get all your prescriptions and allergy medications filled for as long as you can.

Make a visit to the dentist, and be sure that your teeth are in good shape. This is a visit that could cost LOTS if you had to pay it out-of-pocket.

7 Responses to “what kind of bills should i expect to be paying when im 18 and living in an apt?”

  1. REinfo says:

    Remember there’s a set up fee for you utilities. Usually they include it in your first 2 or 3 bills.
    References :

  2. druid says:

    <>Besides rent (don’t forget the security deposits!), gas/electric and phone (and the cell phone, too!), you need to consider cable/satellite TV (if you want to watch it), Internet service (a biggie these days!) and food (most people underestimate the amount they will/need to spend on food, and they spend way more than they should on eating out/fast food). Lesser considerations include renter’s insurance (I strongly recommend it!) and miscellaneous entertainment (video/DVD rentals, etc.). If you are lucky, you can get furniture donations…if not- make use of Sally’s (everyone has to start somewhere!). Make yourself a budget (and stick to it!) and you will make out fine.

    BTW: ahdrianna’s reference right below is an excellent one….READ IT!! Even though it’s 10 years old, it’s a real dose of reality (and scary because that WAS 10 years ago and everything’s gone WAY up since then (gasoline, for example, was only about $1/gallon!!)).
    References :

  3. ahdrianna says:

    Read this, it’s about running away from home but it basically mentions every single cost you could tihnk of and gives you an average cost that you’d have to pay.
    References :
    http://www.bygpub.com/books/tg2rw/chap1excerpt.htm

  4. Kizheart says:

    Well, you would need to buy your own toiletries and groceries…Better go shopping with your mum to know what are the stuff that you may need and what types/ brands are better for which purposes. If your rent does not include your utilities, then you might want to consider that too. All in all, the verdict is that staying on your own is a very expensive thing to do, and unless you have to, its better that you don’t move out.
    Cheers (^.^)
    References :

  5. Remi H says:

    Things independent people have to worry about:

    - Rent
    - Food
    - Phone
    - Car payments
    - Water
    - Electric
    - Gas (for home)
    - Gas (for car)
    - Tuition (if in school)
    - TV (disregard if the standard network programming is good enough for you and you don’t need cable/satellite TV)
    - Internet (that’s an important one)
    - Parking if you need to pay for your apt. complex
    - Laundry if you don’t have a machine to do it at home
    - Also expect to have to call in some repair technicians once in a while, because stuff breaks and that’s just how life works.

    Not to mention other consumables and toiletries, like napkins, tissue, paper towels, toilet paper, toothpaste, shampoo, soap, cleaning tools like vacuum cleaners and toilet bowl scrubbers and mops and dustpans.. ant spray or all-around bug spray is also always good to have.

    Living on your own is not a walk in the park. Sure, it may seem glorious or like some rite of passage to start living on your own, but in my experience, for the first two or three years it really wears on you and all you do is miss home, miss home cooked food (instead of that nasty fast food or TV dinner you get all the time, or.. cereal), and miss having people clean up after you. I’ve also noticed a trend that guys — when living with no females in the house — tend to totally TRASH apartments if they don’t know what they’re doing. Not trying to be gender stereotypical here, just speaking the truth from my wide experience of apartment life.

    Just remember that with freedom comes responsibility, so only follow through with this if you’re sure you can handle every aspect of it and keep a paying job with a wage decent enough to keep yourself out of debt. Good luck in the real world!

    ~Remi
    References :

  6. Sue says:

    One more that nobody has mentioned:

    Health Insurance

    If you are still in school/ college, you can still be covered by your parent’s policy, but once you’re 18 and ‘living on your own’, you can’t be covered any more.

    Be sure you have a job that provides coverage BEFORE you move out, because a simple visit to the doctor can cost you hundreds, and prescriptions aren’t cheap!

    If you’ll be losing coverage, schedule a visit to your doctor before it ends — and get all your prescriptions and allergy medications filled for as long as you can.

    Make a visit to the dentist, and be sure that your teeth are in good shape. This is a visit that could cost LOTS if you had to pay it out-of-pocket.
    References :

  7. Pepper says:

    Electric, phone, cable, food, and rent.
    Be wise and sock some emergency fund money incase you need it. Be reasonable and only get what you need. Be smart and don’t go crazy. And DON"T get a credit card unless you need it for emergencyies and only get like a thousand on it. Have it put in a safe deposit box at your bank and only use it when you really ned it. Too many people make the mistake of getting themselves in debt too fast then they are stuck and back home.
    Good Luck!!
    References :

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