Why do reviewers claim that the HTC One wins over the Galaxy s4?

I’m getting a Galaxy s4 after deciding between getting the s4 or the HTC Onw. However, when I was doing my research, so many "versus" articles and videos between the One and s4 claimed the One as a winner. The s4 has more personalization, better specs, removable battery and storage, better camera and more features. I know a lot of the features are gimmicky, but they’re still impressive.

I know one of the reasons why the HTC One may have an advantage is because of the build quality. However, I feel that the aluminum on the One will chip and dent easily, and I’ll end up putting on a case.

After, all this, why is the HTC One superior?

Please note that I’m not hating, and that I am not some fanboy, but I am just wondering about something that I do not know yet…

All help is appreciated.

Not many people care about removable battery and storage (see iPhone sales) though I’m with the ones that do. However, both phones can get above moderate power users through the day on a single charge. There’s also still cloud storage options like DropBox and Google Drive, though that means you would need an internet connection. It’s not the best substitute for microSDs, but it’s a proper one.

As far as specs go, both phones have the same processors (S4 is slightly clocked higher at 1.9 Ghz to One’s 1.7 Ghz) and same GPUs. The 2 GB of RAM is more than either phone will need for the foreseeable future for gaming.

S4 has the bigger display at 5 inches compared to the One’s 4.7, but some would rather have a small trade off with the One as it has the sharpest screen on any smartphone out right now coming in at 468 ppi compared to the S4′s 441. It also has a brighter screen. Some also believe the Super LCD 3 display presents more realistic colors than the over or undersaturation of the S4′s PenTile Super AMOLED display.

A lot of reviewers love the build quality more on the One due to its aluminium shell compared to the S4′s polycarbonate material with many claiming the One has a more premium feel in the hand, especially if you leave the phone naked. It’s all a matter of preference.

The camera on the One is much better in low light scenarios (especially indoors in a restaurant, bar, or nightclub) while the S4 is slightly better in daylight (megapixels are a bad measuring stick for cameras, it’s the software that counts). However because of the megapixel count, you can zoom in better with the S4. A lot of camera features are the same on both phones outside of S4′s dual camera mode.

Personalizing can be fixed on both phones with a new launcher on Google Play, but when it comes to Sense and TouchWiz, it’s a matter of preference. Some love the flat simplicity of Sense and closer look to vanilla Android while others love the colors that jump out on TouchWiz. The user interfaces almost negate the differences in their respective pre-installed Android JellyBean. Before I decided, navigating through Sense seemed much smoother to me as well (iOS smooth) than TouchWiz even taking into account the S4′s higher clocked processor.

The One also has dual speakers on the front and many agree it’s far and away the best on any smartphone out while the S4 keeps its speaker on the back so you may have to cup the phone with your hand to hear better.

For the same price on a 2-year contract, Sense comes with 32 GB of storage while the S4 comes with 16 GB. S4′s bloatware takes up nearly half of that away, none of which you can delete or put on an SD card so rooting would be necessary. A lot of the S4′s biggest new features like Smart Stay and Smart Scroll don’t work with third party apps. Smart Stay doesn’t work with YouTube and other embedded video players and Smart Scroll doesn’t work with all browsers and doesn’t work left or right. S Translator is pretty much the same as Google Translate provided you also download the language packages. Both phones have IR blasters for televisions as well.

If you’re worried about Android updates, HTC is actually one of the best manufacturers when it comes to that. It’s more of the carriers’ fault for the delays. Ars Technica did a study on it.

You really can’t go wrong with either Android. I decided to go with the HTC One. I haven’t regretted my decision. Both phones have "Google Editions" coming out in a month or so. That’s always another option.

One Response to “Why do reviewers claim that the HTC One wins over the Galaxy s4?”

  1. Rich says:

    Not many people care about removable battery and storage (see iPhone sales) though I’m with the ones that do. However, both phones can get above moderate power users through the day on a single charge. There’s also still cloud storage options like DropBox and Google Drive, though that means you would need an internet connection. It’s not the best substitute for microSDs, but it’s a proper one.

    As far as specs go, both phones have the same processors (S4 is slightly clocked higher at 1.9 Ghz to One’s 1.7 Ghz) and same GPUs. The 2 GB of RAM is more than either phone will need for the foreseeable future for gaming.

    S4 has the bigger display at 5 inches compared to the One’s 4.7, but some would rather have a small trade off with the One as it has the sharpest screen on any smartphone out right now coming in at 468 ppi compared to the S4′s 441. It also has a brighter screen. Some also believe the Super LCD 3 display presents more realistic colors than the over or undersaturation of the S4′s PenTile Super AMOLED display.

    A lot of reviewers love the build quality more on the One due to its aluminium shell compared to the S4′s polycarbonate material with many claiming the One has a more premium feel in the hand, especially if you leave the phone naked. It’s all a matter of preference.

    The camera on the One is much better in low light scenarios (especially indoors in a restaurant, bar, or nightclub) while the S4 is slightly better in daylight (megapixels are a bad measuring stick for cameras, it’s the software that counts). However because of the megapixel count, you can zoom in better with the S4. A lot of camera features are the same on both phones outside of S4′s dual camera mode.

    Personalizing can be fixed on both phones with a new launcher on Google Play, but when it comes to Sense and TouchWiz, it’s a matter of preference. Some love the flat simplicity of Sense and closer look to vanilla Android while others love the colors that jump out on TouchWiz. The user interfaces almost negate the differences in their respective pre-installed Android JellyBean. Before I decided, navigating through Sense seemed much smoother to me as well (iOS smooth) than TouchWiz even taking into account the S4′s higher clocked processor.

    The One also has dual speakers on the front and many agree it’s far and away the best on any smartphone out while the S4 keeps its speaker on the back so you may have to cup the phone with your hand to hear better.

    For the same price on a 2-year contract, Sense comes with 32 GB of storage while the S4 comes with 16 GB. S4′s bloatware takes up nearly half of that away, none of which you can delete or put on an SD card so rooting would be necessary. A lot of the S4′s biggest new features like Smart Stay and Smart Scroll don’t work with third party apps. Smart Stay doesn’t work with YouTube and other embedded video players and Smart Scroll doesn’t work with all browsers and doesn’t work left or right. S Translator is pretty much the same as Google Translate provided you also download the language packages. Both phones have IR blasters for televisions as well.

    If you’re worried about Android updates, HTC is actually one of the best manufacturers when it comes to that. It’s more of the carriers’ fault for the delays. Ars Technica did a study on it.

    You really can’t go wrong with either Android. I decided to go with the HTC One. I haven’t regretted my decision. Both phones have "Google Editions" coming out in a month or so. That’s always another option.
    References :
    AnandTech
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6747/htc-one-review
    http://www.anandtech.com/show/6914/samsung-galaxy-s-4-review

    Ars Technica
    http://arstechnica.com/gadgets/2012/12/the-checkered-slow-history-of-android-handset-updates/

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